16/06/2024

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The Surprising Rules Teachers Had to Follow in the 1930s: How Did They Survive?

The Surprising Rules Teachers Had to Follow in the 1930s: How Did They Survive?

The Surprising Rules Teachers Had to Follow in the 1930s: How Did They Survive?

Teaching in the 1930s was a far cry from the way it is today. Not only were the salary, hours, and workload much more demanding, but the rules that teachers had to follow were incredibly strict. From dress codes to prohibitions on marriage and motherhood, teachers were expected to adhere to a set of rules that were designed to keep them from being a “distraction” to their students. But despite the rigors of the job, teachers in the 1930s were able to make their way through the decade with a combination of determination and resilience.

Teachers Had to Dress a Certain Way

In the 1930s, teachers were required to dress a certain way. Female teachers had to wear dresses or skirts and blouses, while male teachers had to wear suits or other professional attire. Teachers were expected to be well-groomed and presentable at all times. Even the length of their hair was regulated; male teachers were not allowed to have their hair too long, and female teachers had to keep their hair in a neat bun or other updo.

Teachers Were Not Allowed to Marry or Have Children

In the 1930s, many schools had a rule prohibiting teachers from getting married or having children. This rule was often seen as a way to ensure that teachers were focused on their job and not distracted by family life. The rule was especially strict for female teachers, who were often expected to resign if they got married or had children.

Teachers Were Not Allowed to Socialize With Students

In the 1930s, teachers were not allowed to socialize with their students outside of school. This rule was in place to prevent teachers from becoming too close with their students and potentially exerting an inappropriate amount of influence over them.

Teachers Had to Follow a Rigid Curriculum

In the 1930s, teachers had to follow a very rigid curriculum. This was in stark contrast to the more flexible and creative approaches to teaching that are seen today. Teachers were expected to stick to the curriculum and teach the material without deviating from it.

Teachers Had to Work Long Hours

Teaching in the 1930s was a demanding job. Teachers were expected to work long hours, often starting in the early morning and working late into the evening. They were also expected to be available for extra duties outside of their normal teaching hours, such as attending parent-teacher meetings and supervising students’ activities.

Teachers Had to Work for Low Salaries

Teachers in the 1930s were paid very little for their hard work. In fact, the average teacher’s salary was just $1,000 a year, which is the equivalent of about $17,000 in today’s money. This made it difficult for teachers to make ends meet, and many had to take on additional jobs in order to support themselves.

How Did Teachers Survive in the 1930s?

Despite the difficult conditions and the strict rules that teachers had to follow in the 1930s, many were able to make it through the decade with a combination of determination and resilience. They were able to maintain their composure and stay focused on their job, despite the long hours and low salaries. They also had strong support networks of colleagues and administrators who helped them navigate the challenging conditions.

Today, teachers have far more freedoms and rights than they did in the 1930s. They are able to marry, have children, and dress however they please. They are also able to rely on unions and other organizations to protect their rights and ensure fair working conditions.

At PrepperStories.com, we recognize and appreciate the hard work and dedication of teachers all over the world. We hope that by exploring the history of teachers in the 1930s, we can gain a better understanding of the struggles that many teachers had to endure, and gain a greater appreciation for the profession.